5 Important Factors to Consider when Developing a Visitation Schedule

One of the most difficult parts of a divorce, or a break up when children are involved, is making a visitation schedule. In most cases, both parents are going to want to have as much time with the child as possible, which is why conflicts can so easily arise. If both parents work hard to put the best interests of the kids first, however, a good schedule can be made that will work for everyone involved. When creating the schedule, it is important to consider the following five factors and make sure they are properly addressed.

Promotion of Frequent Contact with Each Parent

The most important thing about a visitation schedule is making sure that it is set up in such a way as to promote a strong relationship between the children and each parent. Whenever possible, this means having each parent spend time with the child on a frequent basis. This can be worked out in many different ways, but making sure both parents are spending time with the children each week is ideal. Of course, if one parent lives out of state, this may not be practical.

Scheduling Holidays & Other Important Dates

Every visitation schedule should have a separate section that covers holidays and other important dates, which would take precedence over the normal schedule. Most parents find that splitting up each of the most important holidays each year, and then swapping the next year, is a good compromise. In some situations, however, one parent will have a special connection with a specific holiday. In these situations, it may be helpful to allow that parent to have the child on that holiday every year.

Transportation Requirements

Even when both parents live relatively close to each other, transportation can be quite a challenge. This becomes especially true as children age and attend school and other events. Identifying who will be responsible for what portion of the transportation now will help avoid conflicts in the future.

Changes as Children Age

The needs of children at the age of 6 months are going to be dramatically different than when they are 6 years old. Adding in specific dates or ages when a visitation agreement will be reviewed and adjusted can help prevent surprises or problems in the future. Key milestones such as when they start school, when they get a driver’s license, or even when a new sibling is born can be great times to discuss changes to a visitation schedule.

Child’s Activities

As children get older they will begin engaging in additional activities that don’t directly involve family. This could be things like cub scouts, sports, clubs, and more. These types of activities are good and healthy, but they will necessarily reduce the amount of time each parent is able to see the child. Taking these activities into account when making a visitation schedule can help ensure each parent is able to spend meaningful time with the children.

Contact Us

If you need help with a visitation schedule, or you just need an attorney to write up an agreement you have already made, please contact us. Amsberry Law Firm has years of experience helping parents work out all types of visitation schedules, and we would be honored to help you as well.

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Written by Amsberry Law Firm

Amsberry Law Firm

Mr. Amsberry is board-certified in labor and employment law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. He is a proven litigator who has argued before the United States 5th Circuit Court of Appeals and earned favorable outcomes in complex, precedent-setting employment and civil rights cases. He served as a reservist assistant judge advocate general in the U.S. Army and is a sought-after lecturer and speaker on a range of legal issues.

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