7 Things to Think About Before Naming a Guardian for Your Children, Part I

It is a scenario that no parent wants to think about, but every parent should: who will raise your children if something were to happen to you? For parents with children under the age of 18, naming a guardian is one of the most important aspects of creating a will.

The guardians you name will be responsible for raising and providing for your children, and it is a decision that should not be taken lightly. In this blog, we’ve detailed seven things you should think about before naming a guardian in your will.

1) What will be best for your children?

A lot of emotions come into play when it comes to guardianship proceedings. It is essential that you set aside your emotions as much as possible and think pragmatically. Who will truly be the best person to raise your children? A close family member may seem like the natural choice, but perhaps a friend is better equipped to handle raising your child. Do not be afraid to hurt feelings or disappoint loved ones. This is the lives of your children, and you simply have to do what will be best for them.

2) Finances

Will your potential guardian have enough income to support raising your child[ren]? The fact is, money makes the world go ‘round, and if a person who otherwise seems like a great candidate to raise your kids does not have enough assets to support more mouths to feed, you should probably cross them off your list.

3) Age of guardians

Many people immediately think of their own parents as the top choice to act as guardians, but as we mentioned before, you need to be pragmatic about your decision. Will the age of your parents or other possible guardians adversely affect how your kids are raised? Will the risk that the guardian could pass away be too high? Think about how the age of the potential guardian could impact your kids lives.

Be sure to check back next month when we will post Part 2 of this blog detailing four more vital things to think about before naming a guardian for your children. For more information on guardianships or other aspects of estate planning, please contact the Amsberry Law Firm today.

Written by Amsberry Law Firm

Amsberry Law Firm

Mr. Amsberry is board-certified in family and labor and employment law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. He is also active in family law, estate and elder law, and business law. He is a proven litigator who has argued before the United States 5th Circuit Court of Appeals and earned favorable outcomes in complex, precedent-setting employment and civil rights cases. He served as a reservist assistant judge advocate general in the U.S. Army and is a sought-after lecturer and speaker on a range of legal issues.