Understanding Workplace Discrimination

Workplace discrimination is a major issue that unfortunately impacts employees of all kinds, across all fields, and for various reasons. It is important for workers to have a full understanding of what constitutes workplace discrimination so that they will know if it ever happens to them and can fight against it so that they can stand up for others who are being discriminated against, and so that they can avoid being the perpetrators of workplace discrimination themselves. 

 

To understand what constitutes workplace discrimination, you must first understand that there are certain qualities and characteristics people can have that the law protects them from being discriminated against. These are referred to as “protected classes” and they include:

 

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Skin color or race
  • National origin or social group
  • Disabilities, be they physical, intellectual, or psychiatric.
  • Marital status
  • Pregnancy or having children
  • Religion
  • Political leanings
  • Being involved in a union

 

Employers are not allowed to take these attributes into consideration when making decisions about any aspect of your employment. Additionally, no one — not your boss, a coworker, or anyone else you work with — is allowed to make fun of you or insult you based on the protected classes. If they do so, they are breaking the law. It is still considered workplace discrimination even if it occurs unintentionally.

 

As previously stated, workplace discrimination can take many forms. Examples of situations where workplace discrimination occurs include:

 

  • Hiring and firing practices (Ex. if you are not hired because of your age or if you are fired because of your political opinions)
  • Payment (Ex. if a woman is paid less than a man who performs the same duties and has the same amount of experience)
  • Scheduling (Ex. if your boss gives you fewer shifts after finding out you are pregnant)
  • Denial of training opportunities and promotions (Ex. if you find out your boss passed you up for a promotion because he heard you were involved in the union)
  • Exclusion (Ex. if your coworkers stop looping you in on important emails when they find out you do not practice the same religion as they do)

 

Who can help? 

 

If you have endured or are enduring workplace discrimination, The Amsberry Law Firm is here to help. You may be owed compensation and your employer needs to face the consequences of mistreating you. We offer new clients a free phone consultation. Give us a call at (210) 354-2244 to schedule yours.

Written by Amsberry Law Firm

Amsberry Law Firm

Mr. Amsberry is board-certified in family and labor and employment law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. He is also active in family law, estate and elder law, and business law. He is a proven litigator who has argued before the United States 5th Circuit Court of Appeals and earned favorable outcomes in complex, precedent-setting employment and civil rights cases. He served as a reservist assistant judge advocate general in the U.S. Army and is a sought-after lecturer and speaker on a range of legal issues.